Double Buckwheat Double Chocolate Cookies

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and TastyI am beyond thrilled to finally share this recipe with you! I made these delicious cookies a couple of weeks ago and have been dying to get this recipe in your hands. In fact, the buckwheat flour that I used I made with my flour mill that I posted about a little while ago. It was absolutely perfect in these cookies. Before about six months ago I’d been scared of buckwheat. I thought it was tough, wheaty, dense, and just plain not good. That was until our neighbor invited us over for breakfast for dinner and she made us buckwheat pancakes that were absolutely divine. Since then I’ve been dabbling in different ways to use it. These Double Buckwheat Double Chocolate Cookies are one of my absolute favorite ways. 

This original recipe from Dorie Greenspan has everything I’ve always wanted in a cookie. A crispy edge yet soft inside texture. A bit of crunch. And of course, chocolate! I was excited to put my new OXO products to good use. My Non-Stick Pro Cookie Sheet is one of my newest favorite kitchen tools. It features a unique micro-textured pattern that gives you even baking and adds structural rigidity. It also has an oversized edge makes it easy to grip and carry to and from oven. I also used my new Illuminating Digital Hand Mixer (I’ve been in DIRE need of a new hand mixer). It includes intuitive digital controls to steadily increase or decrease speed… and is as smooth as butter. I also am super excited about my Double Pastry Wheel. I decided to go with the free form cookies and I was majorly impressed by how easily it cut through the cookies. Give these a try. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised!

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double- Chocolate Cookies // "The buckwheat is the charmer here. The flour makes the cookies tender and gives them a subtle nuttiness that only buckwheat habitués will identify". Trust me when I tell you that you WILL want to make these cookies. They are perfect all year round and would be especially wonderful at your next cookie exchange! | Tried and Tasty

Double-Buckwheat Double-Chocolate Cookies

Serves 80
"I doubled up on the two most important ingredients in these cookies, and I even doubled up on how you craft them. There are two kinds of buck- wheat in the cookies, buckwheat flour and kasha (buckwheat groats), and two kinds of chocolate, cocoa powder and dark chocolate. There are two different ways to make them: slice-and-bake or arts-and-crafts free-form."
Write a review
Print
53 calories
6 g
11 g
3 g
1 g
2 g
11 g
31 g
3 g
0 g
1 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
11g
Servings
80
Amount Per Serving
Calories 53
Calories from Fat 26
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 3g
5%
Saturated Fat 2g
9%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 11mg
4%
Sodium 31mg
1%
Total Carbohydrates 6g
2%
Dietary Fiber 0g
2%
Sugars 3g
Protein 1g
Vitamin A
2%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
0%
Iron
1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 2⁄3 cups (227 grams) all-purpose flour
  2. 1 cup (120 grams) buckwheat flour
  3. 1⁄4 cup (21 grams) unsweetened cocoa powder
  4. 2 sticks (8 ounces; 226 grams) unsalted butter, cut into chunks, at room temperature
  5. 1⁄2 cup (100 grams) sugar
  6. 1⁄4 cup (50 grams) packed light brown sugar
  7. 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  8. 2 large egg yolks, at room temperature
  9. 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  10. 1⁄4 cup (45 grams) kasha, preferably Wolff’s medium granulation (see headnote)
  11. 4 ounces (113 grams) bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
  12. 2 teaspoons sanding sugar, mixed with 1 teaspoon flake sea salt, such as Maldon, for sprinkling
Instructions
  1. If you’re going to make free-form cookies, position the racks to divide the oven into thirds and preheat it to 350 degrees F. (If you’ll be making slice-and-bake cookies, preheat the oven after the logs have chilled.)
  2. Whisk both flours and the cocoa powder together. (If the cocoa is lumpy, sift the dry ingredients, then whisk to blend.)
  3. Working with a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or in a large bowl with a hand mixer, beat the butter, both sugars and the salt together on medium speed until smooth, about 3 minutes. Drop in the yolks and beat for another minute, scraping the bowl as needed, then add the vanilla. Turn the mixer off, add the dry ingredients all at once and mix on low speed until they are almost incorporated. This takes a minute more than you might think it should; at first the dough looks crumbly and then it starts to darken, moisten and come together. Mix in the kasha and chopped chocolate. Use a large flexible spatula to give the dough another few turns and mix in any loose ingredients.
  4. Turn the dough out and divide in half.
  5. To make free-form cookies: Shape each piece of dough into a disk. One at a time, place between pieces of parchment paper and roll out to a thickness of 1⁄4 inch. It’s the thickness, not the shape, that matters. (I usually go for a rough oval or round.) Peel away both pieces of paper from one piece of dough, then return the dough to one piece of paper and slide it onto a baking sheet (if you don’t loosen the bottom paper, the dough will curl during baking). Repeat with the second piece of dough. Sprinkle the dough with the sugar-salt mixture.
  6. Bake for 14 to 15 minutes, rotating the sheets top to bottom and front to back at the midway mark, or until the cookies are set — the edges will be more set than the center, which might still have a bit of give when gently prodded. Slide each cookie slab, still on the parchment, onto the counter. Using a pizza wheel or a knife, cut the big cookie into as many cookies of whatever shape you like. I cut it into strips about 1 inch wide and then cut these diagonally so that I end up with diamond-shaped cookies. Slide the cookies, still on the paper, onto a rack to cool to room temperature.
  7. To make slice-and-bake cookies: Roll each piece of dough into a log that’s 12 inches long. Wrap well and freeze for at least 1 hour, or refrigerate for at least 2 hours.
  8. When you’re ready to bake, preheat the oven as on page 203. Slice each log 1⁄3 inch thick and place the cookies about an inch apart on two baking sheets lined with parchment paper or silicone mats. Sprinkle with the sugar-salt mixture.
  9. Bake for 11 to 12 minutes, rotating the sheets top to bottom and front to back at the midway mark, until the cookies are firm around the edges and give slightly when pressed in the center. Transfer the cookies to racks to cool completely.
Notes
  1. Storing
  2. If you’d like, you can freeze the dough, either rolled out or shaped into logs, for up to 2 months; be certain to wrap it well. The logs can also be refrigerated for up to 3 days. The cookies can be baked (or sliced and baked) straight from the freezer; add a minute or two to the baking time. The cookies will keep covered at room temperature for about 4 days; they can be frozen, well wrapped, for up to 2 months.
Adapted from Dorie’s Cookies
beta
calories
53
fat
3g
protein
1g
carbs
6g
more
Adapted from Dorie’s Cookies
Tried and Tasty http://triedandtasty.com/
*This post may contain affiliate links. I include these links to help you find either specific {or my favorite} products that are used in my recipes. If you purchase an item from the link on Tried an Tasty, I will receive a small commission helping keep my recipes free for you. Thank you for your support!

Tried and Tasty, LLC is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com